RIP Roy Hargrove

royhargrove
In August, 2012, I heard a trumpet playing that was so brilliant and happy, I jumped from my desk to follow it. I found Roy Hargrove playing a free concert in City Hall Park. His trumpet playing gave me a light, breezy sensation that swept away a phase of spiraling darkness I’d been trying to escape for months. The songs he performed that Sunday afternoon kept me buoyant for a long time.
After that, we got tickets to har him whenever we could–whether we could “afford” it or not. He traditionally performed at Chicago’s JazzCase in Chicago at Christmas and those shows were such a high point after too many family traditions.
We heard him play with the RH Factor at the Highline Ballroom in New York, and more than once at The Blue Note. The last few times we saw him, he seemed unwell but with his band, still put on a smart, uplifting show.
My husband will never forget his performance (I was suffering a migraine) at the Litchfield Connecticut jazz Festival, where our daughter was attending a jazz camp. It was mid-day in mid-August, in the mid 90’s, and various jazz artists sleepwalked though their sets under a big tent. No one, it seemed, had the energy to break through the heat and humidity. Until Roy (who was from Waco, Texas) emerged, immaculately dressed in an electric blue suit and tie, his hair in neat dreadlocks. He snapped his fingers rapidly to set the pace for the band and they
took off into a searing hour and a half set. He outburned the sun that day.
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trumpet

Saturday night, Manny and I went to the Met’s exhibit of Michelangelo’s drawings. Many of the drawings, paintings and even the few sculptures were studies by the Master’s students and imitators. The picture above (in fact, a photo of a post card I bought) Michelangelo drew.

The plaque explained that an angel, also known as a genius–a usage I’m familiar with, although I didn’t know it harked to the Renaissance–is blowing a trumpet into the man’s head. The angel/genius inspires the man with a blast note to the head. I’ve slightly emphasized the trumpet because to me it looks like a weapon for a blow dart to the naked artist’s brain.

Instead of hearing a trumpet when I saw the drawing, I thought of Bob Marley singing “Trenchtown Rock,” specifically the lyric that includes “hit me with music…brutalize me…”

Crowds filled the space, Two women seemed unaware that assistants had created much of the art. Or that other pieces were intended in homage. Much awed murmuring regarding “the folds of fabric.”

We hadn’t visited the Met in many months, because the new Whitney is walking distance–a nice long walk. Michelangelo’s drawings didn’t move me as much as I expected. But these days, Leonardo da Vinci is my hero. I keep sending my novel, The Vitruvian Man, to people and places to no avail. Meanwhile, I’m rewriting the sequel, The Vitruvian Woman.

Leonardo didn’t care very much if people read what he wrote, according to Walter Isaacson’s biography. He kept intending to order his notebooks and studies for publication, but some intriguing new puzzle always seized him the minute he proved a theory through drawing, observation, and experiment.

He loved learning for its own sake. Being illegitimate and homosexual, he enjoyed being a “misfit.” It freed him from having to meet common social expectations. Mostly unschooled, he sought knowledge relentlessly, and rarely accepted received wisdom without applying his own tests.

But because his discoveries were unpublished, many, if not most, had to be rediscovered hundreds of years later. Isaacson posits his famous “mirror-writing” was not a code, but a method to keep from smearing ink, and one other left-handed writers used.

The one and only trait Leonardo and I have in common is left-handedness. Unlikely to take up mirror-writing, I smear stuff everywhere.