Yasiin Bey at the Blue Note

Yasiin
Sorry my photo isn’t better. Trying to keep it together, I spilled a glass of water.

Robert Glasper and his band are performing at NYC’s Blue Note for a month’s residency.  The guest performer for October 11-14 was Yasiin Bey, formerly known as Mos Def. For  Saturday night’s performance, some of Yasiin’s lines were familiar. Some were not. His delivery, however, struck me as wholly original. He seemed to sculpt rhymes and rhythms in the air, where they lasted all night. He was emphatic and ecstatic, but more than that, he was intent and serious while creating art in real time. Yassin Bey has perfected his rapport with the energy of a spirit at large.

(An original, outside spirit filling one with artistic energy was once what inspired meant.  But its overuse, often regarding not much, has led it into the awesome muck. Possibly, not too distant from Mark Zuckerberg’s empathy.)

During a pause, the young man next to me asked, was this hip-hop? He wondered, too, why change your name when Mos Def is such a great name? Mos Def is a great stage name, but it conveys none of real-life seriousness of an artist who dares to take his work seriously. Of course, all art depends on being playful. Many people play all their lives and are undeniably artistic. But taking the risky, sky-leap into serious art occurs to very few people, and even then, it demands nerve, commitment, and luck.

At one point, he started “Ms. Fat Booty,” and Anderson.Paak joined him onstage. (A surprise–AP had been sitting in the row below me, among the “cheap seats.” The younger rapper, his voice higher, his intention pure fun, blended, perfectly with Yasiin’s lofty joy.

The show ended with Yasiin’s ecstatic litany starting in contradiction, moving through repetition, in which a word or emphasis is altered in loop until what you hear is something like a koan, or no, original truths. (That’s what I thought, anyway.)

Yassin Bey’s raspy voice and supreme invocations offered everyone present the “Sun, Moon, and Stars.”

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Virtuoso Timing

arnold

Dan Leo’s This World or Any Other, the perfectly titled Volume Two of the Memoirs of Arnold Schnabel intensifies the stakes and comic timing. The first volume  unfolded at Cape May, New Jersey during several weeks in the summer of 1963. This second volume occurs on the night of August 10. With virtuoso precision, Arnold’s adventures expand and contract in time, toggling between the astonishing and the familiar. Read this memoir and then the first, or vice versa. The same characters reveal new depths and peaks, while several new friends, saints, demons, and provocateurs prey upon Arnold’s unfailing good manners.

Arnold gives his attention, aid, and counsel to eccentrics and barflies, while worrying about his sanity. Yet he also enjoys a few romantic respites with his beautiful, talented, and profoundly level-headed “lady friend,” as she’s called in 1963. Before long, he’s waylaid by a panoply of supernatural errands, prompts to acts of kindness, calls of nature, and pleas to have one more drink with a deity seeking his human aspect. All necessary and all keeping Arnold from his lover. Indicative of 1963, men openly rate women by their appearance. And while the white characters drop by “the Negro bar,” Arnold casually notes the unlikeliness of reciprocal activity. These signs of the times are asides.

The author’s timing as characters drink one beer and then another, and a few Manhattans followed by more beers, reminded me of a first-rate comedian’s. As a teetotaler, I often find drinking scenes to be the same thing all over again. Not here, though! The repetition works because the writer’s timing keeps every round, down to every swallow, humorous.

Freewheeling through portals and considerate while cringing, Arnold’s concessions to have “just one more” are endearing and funny.